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Crashletes - Netflix

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On Crashletes, NFL superstar Rob Gronkowski, actress Stevie Nelson and comedian Brandon Broady present hilarious fails from the world of amateur sports.

Crashletes - Netflix

Type: Variety

Languages: English

Status: Running

Runtime: 30 minutes

Premier: 2016-07-18

Crashletes - SpongeBob SquarePants - Netflix

SpongeBob SquarePants is an American animated television series created by marine biologist and animator Stephen Hillenburg for Nickelodeon. The series chronicles the adventures and endeavors of the title character and his various friends in the fictional underwater city of Bikini Bottom. The series' popularity has made it a media franchise, as well as the highest rated series to ever air on Nickelodeon, and the most distributed property of MTV Networks. As of late 2017, the media franchise has generated $13 billion in merchandising revenue for Nickelodeon. Many of the ideas for the series originated in an unpublished educational comic book titled The Intertidal Zone, which Hillenburg created in 1989. He began developing SpongeBob SquarePants into a television series in 1996 upon the cancellation of Rocko's Modern Life, and turned to Tom Kenny, who had worked with him on that series, to voice the title character. SpongeBob was originally going to be named SpongeBoy, and the series was to be called SpongeBoy Ahoy!, but both of these were changed, as the name was already trademarked. Nickelodeon held a preview for the series in the United States on May 1, 1999, following the television airing of the 1999 Kids' Choice Awards. The series officially premiered on July 17, 1999. It has received worldwide critical acclaim since its premiere and gained enormous popularity by its second season. A feature film, The SpongeBob SquarePants Movie, was released in theaters on November 19, 2004, and a sequel was released on February 6, 2015. In 2017, the series began airing its eleventh season and was renewed for a twelfth season. The series has won a variety of awards, including six Annie Awards, eight Golden Reel Awards, four Emmy Awards, 12 Kids' Choice Awards, and two BAFTA Children's Awards. Despite its widespread popularity, the series has been involved in several public controversies, including one centered on speculation over SpongeBob's intended sexual orientation. In 2011, a newly described species of fungi, Spongiforma squarepantsii, was named after the cartoon's title character. A Broadway musical based on the series opened in 2017 to critical acclaim.

Crashletes - Controversies - Netflix

A 2011 study conducted at the University of Virginia and published in the journal Pediatrics suggested that allowing preschool-aged audiences to watch the series caused short-term disruptions in mental function and attention span due to frequent shot changes. A Nickelodeon executive responded in an interview that the series was not intended for an audience of that age and that the study used “questionable methodology and could not possibly provide the basis for any valid findings that parents could trust”. Several episodes of the series have been subject to controversy as well. In a report titled Wolves in Sheep's Clothing, which documents the increase in potentially violent, profane, and sexual content in children's programming, the Parents Television Council, a watchdog media group, claimed the season 2 SpongeBob SquarePants episode “Sailor Mouth” was an implicit attempt to promote and satirize use of profanity among children, while “SpongeBob's Last Stand” and “Selling Out” have been accused of promoting environmentalism and left-wing politics due to their negative portrayal of big business. “SpongeBob, You're Fired”, a 2013 season 9 episode, gained heavy controversy and sparked a political debate over its portrayal of unemployment; after Fox News and the New York Post commented on the episode, Media Matters for America accused the two organizations of using the episode to “attack the social safety net”. This statement was echoed by Al Sharpton, who claimed conservatives' “new hero” to be “a sponge who lives in a pineapple under the sea”.

In 2005, an online video that showed clips from SpongeBob SquarePants and other children's shows set to the Sister Sledge song “We Are Family” to promote diversity and tolerance was attacked by an evangelical group in the United States, because they saw SpongeBob being used to “advocate homosexuality”. James Dobson of Focus on the Family accused the video of promoting homosexuality, due to it being sponsored by a pro-tolerance group. The incident accentuated questions as to whether or not SpongeBob is gay. Although the character has enjoyed popularity with gay viewers, series creator Stephen Hillenburg had already denied the issue three years earlier, clarifying at the time that he considers the character to be “somewhat asexual”. After Dobson's comments, Hillenburg reasserted his position, stating that sexual preference does not play a part in what they are “trying to do” with the series. Tom Kenny and other production members were distraught that such an issue had arisen. Dobson later stated that his comments were taken out of context and that his original complaints were not with SpongeBob, the video, or any of the characters in the video, but rather with the organization that sponsored the video, the We Are Family Foundation. Dobson said that the We Are Family Foundation posted pro-gay material on their website, but later removed it. After the controversy, John H. Thomas, the United Church of Christ's general minister and president, said they would welcome SpongeBob into their ministry. He said “Jesus didn't turn people away. Neither do we”. Jeffery P. Dennis, author of the journal article “Queertoons”, argued that SpongeBob and Sandy are not romantically in love, while adding that he believed that SpongeBob and Patrick “are paired with arguably erotic intensity”. Martin Goodman of Animation World Magazine described Dennis' comments regarding SpongeBob and Patrick as “interesting”. Ukrainian website Family Under the Protection of the Holy Virgin, which has been described as a “fringe Catholic” group by The Wall Street Journal, levied criticism against SpongeBob SquarePants for its alleged “promotion of homosexuality”. The group sought to have the series banned, along with several other popular children's properties. The National Expert Commission of Ukraine on the Protection of Public Morality took up the matter for review in August 2012. In April 2009, Burger King released a SpongeBob-themed advertisement featuring a parody of Sir Mix-a-Lot's song “Baby Got Back”. The Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood protested the ad for being sexist and inappropriately sexual, especially contemplating that SpongeBob's fan base includes young children. In official statements released by Burger King and Nickelodeon, both companies claimed that the campaign was aimed at parents.

Crashletes - References - Netflix